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The women's movement is too diverse for any one symbol...but if I had to name a group that symbolized the best of feminism in this country, I would say, 'The Guerrilla Girls.' Smart, radical, funny, creative, uncompromising, and (I assume) diverse under those inspired gorilla masks, they force us to rethink everything from art to zaniness. —Gloria Steinem

Long before Al Gore made the powerpoint presentation sexy in An Inconvenient Truth, these women were just taking the facts ma'am and really making them into an audacious visual assault on the art world. —Alison Cuddy, WBEZ Radio, Chicago

They make culture hacking look good. Really good. —Wired

Their work is taught in art history classes, they are written about in doctoral dissertations and for years they've been regulars on the college circuit. But that doesn't mean they've removed their masks or lost their bite. —Phoebe Hoban, The New York Times

The Guerrilla Girls took feminist theory, gave it a populist twist and some Madison Avenue pizazz and set it loose in the streets. —Roberta Smith, The New York Times

The work of the Guerrilla Girls represents a most powerful political union between theory and practice. They set an example for feminists everywhere. —bell hooks

The posters were rude; they named names and they printed statistics. They embarassed people. In other words, they worked. —Susan Tallman, Arts Magazine

The Girls are quippy as well as lippy. They are the Fun-Guard of feminism. —Ginny Dougary, The Times (London)

Sometimes, battling sexism in the normal way just won’t do. Sometimes, you must don a gorilla mask, adopt the name of a dead female artist and send estrogen pills to the White House. —Heather Svokos, Lexington (KY) Herald-Leader

...waging what they call cultural warfare...where the main ammunition is wit. —CNN

The Guerrilla Girls are not only making waves in the art world, they're making the F-word fashionable again. —Paula Shutkever, Everywomen Magazine

Their message celebrates each woman's uniqueness. By insisting on a world as if women mattered, and also the joy of getting there, the Guerrilla Girls pass the ultimate test: they make us both laugh and fight; both happy and strong. —Gloria Steinem

Clearly, these Girls aren't the wait-by-the-phone type. —Margot Ebling, The Village Voice

The Guerrilla Girls change the world one sloganeering poster at a time. —Time Out New York

Their weapons of terror....are irony and rhetoric rather than rubber bullets and gelignite. —Guy Trebay,The Village Voice

...the feminist pranksters.... —Newsweek

...those rabid feminists.... —The New York Post

Praise for Bitches, Bimbos and Ballbreakers: The Guerrilla Girls' Illustrated Guide to Female Stereotypes

In their latest literary action, Bitches, Bimbos and Ballbreakers, the girls have turned their hairy heads towards a galaxy of stereotypes leveraged at women throughout history, and their gaze is positively withering... But don't go adding Bitches to your list of 'boring-yet-relevant-new-books-I-should-read'...Every entry is saturated with funny, quirky, cultural satire... Bust Magazine

Although it tackles a serious subject, the book is delightfully campy and breezy, filled with short sidebards, quirky photos and sarcastic diatribes that go for the jugular.—Detroit Metrotimes

Praise for The Guerrilla Girls' Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art

A leveling indictment of bigotry in the art world, the work of the Guerrilla Girls elevates cage-bar rattling to a fine art. —Mark Dery, The New York Times Book Review

...the book is much more than a girlie slap in the face of art world politics; it's more like a sock to the gut. —Raven Moon, moxie

Praise for Confessions Of The Guerrilla Girls

"THE ADVANTAGES OF OWNING CONFESSIONS OF THE GUERRILLA GIRS:

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Knowing the royalties aren't going to a smug white guy artist in a Dewar's ad.

-Replacing all those art books on the coffee table which only mention a woman's name in the index (under 'Nudes') andi n the dedication to Mom.

-Reviving the dying gorilla-suit industry.

-Supporting a wonderful group of rabble-rousing artist-activists who prove that feminists (a) have a sense of humor after all, (b) like to dress up, and (c) are pretty cool gals all the way around.

—Susan Faludi

Praise for The Guerrilla Girls' exhibition at the Venice Biennale

Kick-ass. —Walter Robinson, Artnet Magazine

The surrounding walls of the entrance gallery sport colorful vinyl banners by the Guerrilla Girls, the anonymous artists collective that uses billboard and other advertising techniques to chronicle sexism in the worlds of art and popular culture. Here, with the raucous help of busty images of Pamela Anderson and Halle Berry they take on everything from the museums of Venice, with their dearth of art by women, to Hollywood, which the Girls say has given 92.8% of its Academy Awards for writing to men. . . . That Corral and Martínez, the first women to organize the Biennale, have chosen art by women to introduce their shows of personal and public politics is telling.—Christopher Knight,The Los Angeles Times

Praise for The Guerrilla Girls' performances/lectures

Her speech had the whole school inspired including me. We talked about her speech in all our classes for the next year. —School of the Art Institute of Chicago student on the Guerrilla Girls' commencement speech

A pair of Guerrilla Girls, emissaries from a group of New York-based, feminist art activists, packed Loyola University's Roussel Hall lask week with 600 enthusiastic fans. The two women, wearing gorilla masks, showed slides, performed satirical skits and regaled the crowd with talks of trench warfare fought against the mostly male art establishment. The show was sophisticated, sometimes self-depracating and certainly inspirational to the eager audience. —Doug MacCash, Art Critic, Times-Picayune

Dear Guerrilla Girls: I recently caught a Guerrilla Girls presentation that stopped in Vancouver and wanted to express how amazing an experience it was. Where else can one educate themselves on some serious subjects, share disgust with a whole audience, and find time to laugh one's ass off in one night? I also wanted to express my appreciation- as a human, an artist, and a person of colour, for what the GGs are working towards. —Audience member in Vancouver

This was the most successful and enriching program/event/speaker I have heard in my four years here. —Student evaluation form, College of Creative Studies, Detroit

I went to a lecture tonight by two of the founding members of the Guerrilla Girls. Best decision I made in a while, I must say. The lecture was AWESOME, very enlightening and humorous. I remember the first poster I saw of them was of a nude female statue with a gorilla mask on and the caption, "Do women have be naked to be in US museums? Only 3% of artists in the Met Museum are female, but 83% of the nudes are female". Apparently they did a resurveying of the Met a few months ago and now the statistics read, 4% female artists and 74% nude female statues. So CLEARLY, there's a lot of work to be done still about the representation of female artists and artists of color.. —Melbourne blogger

When the Girls leave town, the women left behind have been empowered to speak out, and there is no one to blame except a bunch of monkeys from New York. —from But is it Art? “Guerrilla Girl Power: Why the Art World Needs a Conscience” by Elizabeth Hess