A SELECTION OF THE GUERRILLA GIRLS' EXHIBITIONS AND STREET PROJECTS

For a more complete list, see our chronology.

 

GUERRILLA GIRLS: IS IT EVEN WORSE IN EUROPE October, Whitechapel Gallery, London 2016-March 2017
Guerrilla Girls: Is it even worse in Europe? explores diversity in European art organisations. It presents responses to questionnaires sent to 383 directors about their exhibitions programme and collections. The questions were formulated to critically look at the narratives that are produced by cultural institutions.


GUERRILLA GIRLS AT TATE MODERN 2016

ANDY WARHOL AND THE GUERRILLA GIRLSCurated by Mark Godfrey and Hannah Johnston
From the curators: Warhol and the Guerrilla Girls were pioneers in challenging prejudice. While the Guerrilla Girls campaign forcefully against discrimination, Warhol’s Manhattan studio, known as The Factory, provided a welcoming space for those who didn’t conform to the social and sexual conventions of 1960s society.
http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/media-networks/andy-warhol-and-guerrilla-girls

COMPLAINTS DEPARTMENT
The Guerrilla Girls operate a Complaints Department in Tate Exchange, inviting individuals and organisations to come and conspire with the Girls, post complaints about art, culture, politics, the environment, or any other issue they care about.
http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/workshop/tate-exchange/complaints-department


WE CALL IT LUDWIG, THE MUSEUM TURNS 40  August 26, 2016 – January 8, 2017

For Museum Ludwig's 40th birthday exhibition, the Guerrilla Girls surveyed the museum's collection. The results were surprising?


GUERRILLA GIRLS TWIN CITY TAKEOVER January 2016-January 2017
From January to March 2016 the Takeover will include over twenty arts and cultural organizations in Minneapolis/St. Paul and surrounding cities. From small non-profit art centers to major cultural institutions in the region, these partners will be highlighting gender and race inequalities, taking on stereotypes and hypocrisies, and promoting artistic expression by the often overlooked and underrepresented. New projects by the Guerrilla Girls’ are compiled below. For projects by other artists see http://www.ggtakeover.com.

WALKER ART CENTER

MINNEAPOLIS INSTITUTE OF ART

HENNEPIN AVENUE STREET PROJECTS


GUERRILLA GIRLS: NOT READY TO MAKE NICE, 30 YEARS AND STILL COUNTINGAbrons Art Center, NYC, 2015.  Pop-up Birthday Exhibition.
In May 1985 we put our first posters up on the streets of New York and everyone went bananas. May 2015 marked three decades of fighting discrimination and corruption in the world of art, film, politics and pop culture. Although there's still a lot of work to do, we decided to take some time to celebrate 30 years of game changing activism. From May 1-17 we opened a pop-up exhibition at the Abrons Art Center in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The exhibition included almost 100 posters, stickers and billboards from 1985 to 2015, and a wall where anyone could write us a message or complain about issues they care about. Guerrilla Girls Frida Kahlo, Kathe Kollwitz (founding members), Zubeida Agha and Chiyo Uno were on hand to give gallery walkthroughs and lively Q&A's. Thanks so much to everyone who came to the exhibition, walkthroughs, birthday party and went stickering with us in Chelsea. It means the world to us.
CONSPIRE WITH US TO KEEP FEMINISM ALIVE AND WELL INTO THE FUTURE!


GUERRILLA GIRLS 1985-2015Matadero, Madrid, 2015. Retrospective of almost 200 works including photos, letters, and small projects.
In 2013 Xabier Arakistain, an amazing Spanish curator, feminst, and longtime supprorter of the Guerrilla Girls, curated an exhibition of Guerrilla Girls' work from 1985-2013 at the giant cultural center Alhóndiga Bilbao in Spain. In January of 2015 the exhibition opened at the Matadero Madrid, a contemporary art center housed in a repurposed turn of the century slaughterhouse and livestock market. The exhibition includes posters, banners, videos, and lots of correspondence and ephemera from our very first press release in 1985 to our most recent poster calling out billionaire art collectors. As it was in Bilbao, it has been an amazing experience to see all this work in one space at the Matadero. Thank you to everyone who has stopped by!


G I R L - Curated by Pharrell Williams, Galerie Perrotin, Salle de Bal, France, 2014.
The Guerrilla Girls were asked by Pharrell to be in an exhibition called G I R L at Galerie Perrotin Paris. We said ok, ONLY if we could show two new posters: one about women in music and another about women artists at Perrotin.
After watching lots of videos we had a question for Pharrell: why DO WOMEN HAVE TO BE NAKED TO GET INTO MUSIC VIDEOS WHILE 99% OF THE GUYS ARE DRESSED? We did a remix one of our classic posters with a still from Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines.
Then we turned our steely eyes on the Perrotin Gallery. Sure, 50% of the artists in the G I R L exhibition are women, but since 2010 only 13% of solo exhibitions have been by women artists. We grafittied one of our early posters to show that not much has changed: BUS COMPANIES ARE STILL MORE ENLIGHTENED THAN ART GALLERIES.


Guerrilla Girls 1985-2013, Alhondiga, Bilbao, 2013-2014. Retrospective of almost 200 works including photos, letters, smaller projects and new street project.
Xabier Arakistain is an amazing Spanish curator and feminist who has been a supporter of the Guerrilla Girls for many years. He has now curated an exhibition of Guerrilla Girls' work from 1985-2013 at the giant cultural center AlhóndigaBilbao in Spain. There are 70 posters and banners, video, and 13 tables of almost 200 smaller projects, correspondence, ephemera, and street photos. October 3, 2013 through January 19, 2014. It has been an amazing experience to see all this work in one space.


NOT READY TO MAKE NICE: GUERRILLA GIRLS IN THE ARTWORLD AND BEYONDColumbia College, Chicago, 2012.
Ten years of Guerrilla Girls' posters, billboards, books, sticker campaigns and banners, including large scaleprojects done for the Venice Biennale, Istanbul, Ireland, Hollywood and Washington DC.

Spanning two galleries, artwork is organized by theme: Glass Curtain Gallery features work related to the visual art world of museums and galleries, and A+D Gallery focuses on work "beyond" this spectrum including film, politics and feminism.

Not Ready to Make Nice is curated by Neysa Page-Lieberman.

This exhibition is part of a college-wide year-long program organized by DEPS and the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media, of which the Guerrilla Girls are one of the 2011-2012 Fellows. 


GUERRILLA GIRLS AT THE ART BOOM FESTIVAL, Krakow, 2012.
We put up a large scale banner outside the city art gallery, proclaiming in English and Polish: "I'm not a feminist, but if I was, this is what I would complain about …" We got lots of responses. Most Poles don't want to call themselves feminists, but they sure have lots of feminist complaints, from unequal pay for women to tight bras and uncomfortable underwear. Our message: "Admit it: You ARE feminists.


TROUBLER LE REPOS / DISTURBING THE PEACE, Galerie L'UQAM and around the city, Montreal, Quebec, 2009. Curated by Mélanie Boucher.

The Gallery of the University of Quebec at Montreal asked us to do a poster commemorating the 20th anniversary of the l’École Polytechnique massacre, where a disgruntled gunman went into an engineering school in Montreal, separated the women from the men, then proceeded to shoot the women. We decided to focus on the history of hate speech against women and feminists, from the Ancient Greece to Rush Limbaugh. We’re bothered that it has always been OK to make denigrating public statements about women, and shocked by the violence and abuse this language continues to provoke.

Email us if you'd like to bring Disturbing The Peace to your city!


elles @ pompidou, Centre Pompidou, 2009-2012.


PROJECT IRELAND: ALL-IRELAND TOUR, 2009-2010.


As part of this group exhibition we hung a three story long banner version of our movie poster 'Birth of Feminism.' Below is the introduction to the essay "Diary of an Exhibition: On the Path to BODYPOLITICX" written by Florian Waldvogel.

WELCOME
Welcome to the cinema. Welcome to the showroom of forbidden glances. Welcome to the magnetic field of an art dedicated to the fragile three-way relationship between body, lust and image. A film poster on the façade of Witte de With's building introduces the theme: on it is written The Birth of Feminism (2001).

This announces a film that can only be played in our heads. Three actresses, who were the best-known sex symbols at the time of the work's production, pose on the poster as pin-up girls: Pamela Anderson, Halle Berry and Catherine Zeta-Jones as the leading actresses for a film whose title aludes to D.W. Griffith's classic The Birth of a Nation (1951). Guerrilla Girls - an anonymous collective in existence since 1985 with an undefined number of members who always appear in public wearing gorilla masks - have concerned themselves since their inception with the feminist-inspired, witty infiltration of prevailing meaning - production in popular culture, art and advertisements, linked to blind spots in (art) institutional practice.

The banner reading "Equality Now" placed across the hips of the Hollywood stars alludes not only to the name of an international womens' rights organization founded in 1992, but can also be read as the smallest common denominator of the diverse actvities carried out by the three American feminists supposedly portrayed in this fictive film: Gloria Steinem, Flo Kennedy and Bella Abzug. Steinem is the founder of the US magazine Ms. In 1963, she worked as a bunny in New York's Playboy Club, in order to investigate the working conditions for young women in Hugh Hefner's empire. Pamela Anderson, on the other hand, has become a global pin-up as the Baywatch nymph, and to date has been photographed 12 times for Playboy magazine. Steinem was in close contact with Halle Berry's character, Florynce Kennedy. Kennedy is an African-American civil rights activist, who founded the Feminist Party in 1971. Bella Abzug was a Congresswoman, a Member of Parliament from 1970-1976 and an activist in several international womens' organizations.

The poster names as the film's director the chronicler of presidents, wars and other strokes of fate demanded by male heroes and their epics: Oliver Stone. The man responsible for the soundtrack is the white US rapper Eminem, who - in his artistic delirium consisting of cascades of dirty words - relishes the role of the "bad boy," calling his own mother a whore and stylizing himself as the victim of women and as a woman-hater: The Birth of Feminism in a spirit of lustful, ironic misrepresentation. The impossible blockbuster is produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, one of the most successful Hollywood players, who financed amongst other films Pirates of the Caribbean (2003), which served as a blueprint for the most expensive porn film to date: Pirates (2005). In this way, too, signs can fall victim to pirates. 


DEAR COLLECTOR....WE KNOW YOU FEEL TERRIBLE, HAU and Art Athina, Athens, 2007.
We’ve left a little note for collectors who will be descending on Athens, Greece, for the Art Athina International Art, May 30 – June 3, 2007.


Istanbul Modern Museum, 2006. Curated by Rosa Martinez.
In Istanbul, coffee grounds are used to tell people's fortunes. Here is what we discovered at the bottom of a cup of Turkish coffee.


TATE MODERN 2006--present.


SPANISH LANGUAGE VERSION OF OUR "UNCHAIN THE WOMEN DIRECTORS!" BILLBOARD AT THE HOTEL VIRREYES, MEXICO CITY, 2005.
We did appearances in Mexico City from December 4-7, 2006, culminating in the unveiling of this banner on the facade of the historic Hotel Virreyes in the Centro Historico—now an artists' center and artists' residence—sponsored by Centro de Artes, Humanidades y Ciencias en Transdisciplina S.C. (CACHTAS)


ALWAYS A LITTLE FURTHER, 51st Venice Biennale, Curated by Rosa Martinez, 2005.
The Venice Biennale presented its first ever Biennale curated by women since its inception in 1895. 

For the exhibition "Always A Little Further," curated by Rosa Martinez, we created six giant 17-foot posters taking on the Biennale itself (Benvenuti alla Biennale Femminista!), the museums of Venice (Where are the women artists of Venice?), the Bush administration (Women's Terror Alert!), the Artworld (Do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum? 2005 Update), and Hollywood (The Birth of Feminism Movie Poster).


GUERRILLA GIRLS REVIEW THE WHITNEY [GUERRILLA GIRLS SURVEY THE SURVEY.], THE CLOCKTOWER, 1987.
In response to the Whitney Biennial in 1987, the Guerrilla Girls exposed the museum's pathetic and worsening record on women and artists of color in this exhibition at The Clocktower.

The Clocktower, a New York exhibition space, asked us to do a show during the Whitney Museum of American Art's Biennial in 1987. They expected us to do a show of art we thought should be in the Biennial. Instead, we decided to do an exhibition of information exposing the museum's pathetic and worsening record on women and artists of color. All of the statistics came from the museum's own publications. A deep throat passed us confidential information about the lives of the museum's trustees. 

THE LO-DOWN FROM 1987: No black woman had ever been chosen for a Whitney Biennial since 1973; Of the 30 non-white artists who had been in the biennials since 1973, only 3 have had work acquired for the museum collection; More than 70 artists had been chosen for more than one Biennial. Only one of them was non-white; The Whitney's acquisition of art by women had never exceeded 14% in any year. In 1984 only 9% of its acquisitions were of women artists; The work of men chosen for the Biennial was acquired by the museum twice as often as the work of women chosen for the Biennial; More than 70% of the acquisitions of art by women in the Biennials up until then had taken place in the 1970's; The museum already owned works by 12 of the 43 artists in the 1987 Biennial show; Between 1982 - 1987 there had been only one solo show of a woman artist at The Whitney.